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The juniors have something to say

Our young people have a lot to say and they should be allowed to do so. This was part of the genesis behind the National Cultural Foundation’s (NCF’s) Chief Executive Officer, Carol Roberts-Reifer’s decision to modify this year’s Scotiabank Junior Calypso Monarch programme in association with the HIV/AIDS Commission. A sentiment that was also echoed by NCF Cultural Officer Music and Producer of the competition Tristan Layne, who described the vision for this year’s competition as being more inclusive, creating more opportunities for the juniors, and depending on their skills, allowing for more involvement in the whole process of songwriting, composing and arranging. It will also award a few new categories of prizes for not only the young Calypsonians, but for their respective schools.

Shameka Walters, Dancer and performer, taking the participants through physical exercises in preparation for their session.

In addition to the partnership between the NCF and the Ministry of Education, Technological and Vocational Training on the coordination of the competition through the schools, the Foundation enlisted the support of a number of well-known personalities within the entertainment industry to join a mentorship programme. These mentors are assigned to specific participating schools, some with their alma maters, and they have been assisting the entrants with their songwriting, performance and vocal techniques.

Preparations for the 2019 competition included a developmental workshop which focused on Intellectual Property/Copyright conducted by Fiona Hinds and Sonia Nurse; Microphone Use & Stage Presence by Derek Marshall; Movement for Singers by Shameka Walters and Rene Blackman; Vocal Development with Ryan Boyce and Cassandra Greenidge; and Are you competition ready conducted by Samantha Greaves.

When the Scotiabank Junior Calypso Monarch semi-finalists take to the stage this Saturday, July 6 and Sunday, July 7 at the Garfield Sobers Gymnasium complex, among the prizes on offer will be awards for the Best Sweet Soca Song, the Best Power Soca Song, the Best Bashment Soca and the Best Tune of the Crop. This incentive was created in response to the concern about the music played at Junior Kadooment and was designed to ensure that our young masqueraders are parading to more age appropriate content.

The entrants in this 2019 competition will not only be winning prizes for themselves, but the top primary school will get a Multipurpose Activity Room and the top Secondary institution, a fully outfitted Music Lab.

The semi-finalists in each category drew for their positions recently at the NCF’s West Terrace home and will appear on stage to represent their schools in the following order.

Editor’s Note:

Three Categories for 2019
6-10, 11-14 and 15-18

Competed in Four Zones
North – St. Lucy, St. Peter and St. Andrew
West – St. James, St. Thomas and St. Michael
East – St. Joseph, St. John and St. Philip
South – Christ Church and St. George

Semi-final #1
July 6 – 5:00 p.m.
Category 6-10
Twelve participants will compete to advance through to the final
Six participants will advance to the final
One participant will be on reserve

7:00 p.m.
Category 11-14
Twelve participants will compete to advance through to the final
Five participants will advance to meet the reigning monarch in the final
One participant will be on reserve

Semi-final #2
July 7 – 7:00 p.m.
Category 15-18
Twelve participants will compete to advance through to the final
Five participants will advance to meet the reigning monarch in the final
One participant will be on reserve

A combination of submissions from Marketing & Communications interns:
Aisha Butcher and Alec Begg
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